30 Famous Historical Mysteries That Continue to Baffle Us

By Jack Ripley | October 16, 2023

Who And Where Is D.B. Cooper?

This gallery of 30 famous unsolved mysteries from history will bring you across the globe and through the centuries, introducing you to enigmas that have puzzled scholars, intrigued investigators, and captured the public's imagination. From the ghostly murmurs of vanished civilizations to chilling tales of inexplicable events, these mysteries have withstood the onslaught of time, maintaining their veil of secrecy. As you explore, remember: every mystery is a door waiting to be opened, a question yearning for an answer. Will you be the one to solve the unsolvable? Let your journey into the heart of history's greatest mysteries begin...

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(Wikimedia Commons)

"D.B. Cooper" is the byname for the unidentified person responsible for the 1971 hijacking of Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 305, although the pseudonym the hijacker went by was actually "Dan Cooper". Claiming to have a bomb, Cooper demanded $200,000 in ransom and parachuted into the night, never to be seen again. Due to the weather at the time and the parachute landing zone, many speculate that Cooper did not survive the drop. On the other hand, over 1000 potential suspects have been processed by the FBI - but with barely more than a composite sketch to go on, who can be sure? 

Who Committed The Fall River Axe Murders?

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(Wikimedia Commons)

On August 4, 1892, a gruesome crime shocked the quiet city of Fall River, Massachusetts. The victims were Andrew Borden, a wealthy businessman, and his wife, Abby. They were found brutally murdered in their home, their skulls almost unrecognizably shattered from multiple hatchet blows. The prime suspect was their own daughter, Lizzie Borden, a Sunday school teacher of previously unblemished reputation. Thanks to her strange behavior on the day of the murders, the contradictory accounts she gave to the police, and her alleged attempt to purchase poison just days before the killings, the prosecution was able to build a compelling case against Lizzie. However, there was no physical evidence tying Lizzie to the crime. There were no bloodstains on her clothing, and the supposed murder weapon lacked a bloody handle. In the end, after just an hour and a half of deliberation, the jury acquitted Lizzie Borden, citing a lack of evidence. Despite her acquittal, suspicion continued to shadow her until her death in 1927. The Fall River axe murders remain one of the most notorious unsolved mysteries in American history, continuing to inspire debate and speculation.