20 Groovy Treasures From The 1960s That You Totally Forgot About

By Jack Ripley | February 16, 2024

Everyone Loves The Slinky

Are you old enough to remember Beatlemania and dancing the night away in a miniskirt? Maybe you just wish you could still dance to the tunes of Elvis and The Mamas and The Papas. No matter how old you are, the '60s are one of those eras that everyone loves. From the start of the decade when teens began rebelling to the hippie culture of the decade's end, you'll find reminders of the 1960s in our photos of aesthetically pleasing items from back then.

 

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Though it came out in the 1940s, the Slinky picked up even more fans during the 1960s when its manufacturer aired commercials on television. Richard T. James was a mechanical engineer who created the Slinky in 1943 after seeing the way a metal spring moved down a set of stairs. He and his wife, Betty, formed a company that made the toys, which they sold in Gimbel's department stores.

Betty gained control over the company after she and Richard divorced. Under her guidance, the Slinky appeared in commercials where kids delighted in watching the toy go up and down stairs. Johnny McCullough and Homer Fesperman worked with Charles Weagly on the commercial, which became one of the world's most popular jingles as well as one of the longest-lasting ads that still gets stuck in our heads today.

Easy Bake Ovens Made Cooking Fun

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Girls who wanted to be like their moms in the 1960s fell in love with Easy Bake Ovens. Kenner introduced the first oven in 1963, which came in a popular shade of aqua blue. Inside the oven was an incandescent bulb that got just hot enough to cook the food they put inside. To go along with the ovens, Kenner released a line of cookie and cake mixes. Kids combined them with water, poured them inside the metal baking dishes, and cooked desserts inside the mini ovens.

Easy Bake Ovens used a conveyor belt design that made them even easier to use. Once the dish was done, the belt released it from the oven. Kenner later changed the design to make it look more like a full-size oven. The brand later sold Hasbro, which continues making them. New models now come in different colors and designs that use a heating element rather than a bulb for increased safety.